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The 3 questions that can make a huge difference

A open book where the pages are illuminated by a bunch of small lights.
A open book where the pages are illuminated by a bunch of small lights.
Photo by Nong Vang on Unsplash

Your user research may be missing a step that makes a huge difference to your stakeholders.

You have followed the proper steps. You’ve gathered enough users, set up usability tests, and done data analysis.

But have you thought about how you’re going to present your data to your stakeholders? It’s a step that many skim over, but it can be crucial in making presentations that drive stakeholder action.

To start, you need to re-examine your approach.

The approach many Junior UX’ers take

I got my first lesson in presenting to stakeholders when I was told that my presentation was too long.

“You could’ve cut out a lot of the methodology section.” My mentor said, but what she said next stuck with me to this day. …


How a missed UX opportunity cost me hours in data analysis.

A small stream trickles down to larger water and a waterfall.
A small stream trickles down to larger water and a waterfall.
Photo by Kouji Tsuru on Unsplash

Recently, I got to experience the other end of the quote of how “Fixing a project after deployment costs 100x more than fixing it in design.”

What might have been a 5-minute design decision resulted in a 500-minute data-wrangling session to address a problem.

And the whole time I was thinking about how a single change in the UX Design that could have made this process a lot easier.

So if you want to understand how to make the Data Scientists on your team much happier, understand the effect that your design decisions can have on creating structured data.

Data wrangling and structured data

So to begin with, what is structured data? …


Taking a cue from Data Science as a UX Designer.

A list of data commands and various changes that have occurred in a large text backlog.
A list of data commands and various changes that have occurred in a large text backlog.
Photo by Yancy Min on Unsplash

Yesterday, I made about 3 months of project progress clearer to the entire team.

I didn’t have one-on-one interviews with stakeholders or anything drastic.

I simply organized all of the information we had collected and visualized it.

I should know about visualization as a UX Designer. Between designing prototypes, creating design artifacts, and explaining research findings, I thought I knew most of the ways to visualize things.

But it was a technique from Data Science that got me to visualize our Agile backlog.

It made my life a lot easier. And it can make yours easier as well. Here’s how.

Data-aware design

As I mentioned in a previous post, I’ve been getting into Data Visualization and understanding the way that Design and Data Science can interact. …

About

Kai Wong

Healthcare-focused UX designer and researcher. Creator of two online courses on design communication and UX research planning: https://tinyurl.com/y5m2j42v

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